The Process of becoming a Geisha?

December 15, 2005 geishalifestyles

The course of study traditionally starts from a young age and encompasses a wide variety of arts, including musical instruments (particularly the shamisen), traditional forms of singing, traditional dance, tea ceremony, flower arranging , poetry and literature. Ikebana is not traditionally encouraged, however, because the role of a geisha is that of a performer. Ikebana has little or no entertainment value. By watching and assisting senior geisha, the students became skilled in the complex traditions surrounding selecting, matching, and wearing precious kimono, in various games and the art of conversation, and in dealing with clients.

young-giesha.jpg

Once a woman became an apprentice geisha (a maiko) she would begin to accompany senior geisha to the tea houses, parties and banquets that constitute a geisha’s work environment. To some extent, this traditional method of training persists, though it is of necessity foreshortened. Modern geisha are no longer bought by or brought into geisha houses as children. Becoming a geisha is now entirely voluntary. Most geisha now begin their training in their late teens.

Advertisements

Entry Filed under: General

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to comments via RSS Feed

Pages

Categories

Calendar

December 2005
M T W T F S S
    Jan »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
 
%d bloggers like this: